Finding a way to work …

How can young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities access the learning benefits of work?

About 93% of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities have no paid employment. This represents a loss of opportunity with profound implications, including the loss of important opportunities to learn.

This project looks at a way of working that young people may be able to put together for themselves, with their allies. It involves using their interests and strengths and the support of a Personal Assistant to find a form of work that works for them.

I will be asking how far working in this way can make some of the ‘goods of work’ accessible to young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, whether they are paid or not.

I am specially interested in the learning that comes with work, through contributing to shared aims, working with others, and gaining social recognition. The study will explore learning by young people about how to contribute at work, and reciprocally, learning by others about how young people do contribute at work.

Finding a way to work …

Project based at the University of Southampton.

Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

00 44 (0)7463 878777

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